Accommodating learning style

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Much of Kolb’s theory is concerned with the learner’s internal cognitive processes.

Kolb states that learning involves the acquisition of abstract concepts that can be applied flexibly in a range of situations.

They are interested in people, tend to be imaginative and emotional, and tend to be strong in the arts.

People with the diverging style prefer to work in groups, to listen with an open mind and to receive personal feedback.

Whatever influences the choice of style, the learning style preference itself is actually the product of two pairs of variables, or two separate 'choices' that we make, which Kolb presented as lines of axis, each with 'conflicting' modes at either end: A typical presentation of Kolb's two continuums is that the east-west axis is called the Processing Continuum (how we approach a task), and the north-south axis is called the Perception Continuum (our emotional response, or how we think or feel about it).

Kolb believed that we cannot perform both variables on a single axis at the same time (e.g. Our learning style is a product of these two choice decisions.

It is often easier to see the construction of Kolb's learning styles in terms of a two-by-two matrix.

Kolb's experiential learning theory works on two levels: a four stage cycle of learning and four separate learning styles.

People with a converging learning style are best at finding practical uses for ideas and theories.

They can solve problems and make decisions by finding solutions to questions and problems.

They are attracted to new challenges and experiences, and to carrying out plans.

They commonly act on 'gut' instinct rather than logical analysis.

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